Painting for sale

A painting on canvas, signed and professionally framed.

CAM00087

$250.00 OBO. All offers considered.

Contact for details

Phone: Ariana @ (845) 389-8674

Email: ariana@boudica.us

Posted in Kingston, Red Hook, Rhinebeck | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Visit Love Stitches By Naomi

Click image for online store

or click here to visit on face book.

Posted in Business, Dutchess county, Mid-Hudson Valley, Red Hook, Red Hook Business, Rhinebeck, Rhinebeck Business, Uncategorized, Village of Rhinebeck | Leave a comment

Here Comes the Judge!

news1-15-10

Chabad of Mid-Hudson Valley Newsletter

Friday, August 29, 2014
Elul 3, 5774
Parshat Shoftim
Pirkei Avot: Chapter 1

       logo                       B”H 


A word from the Rabbi


Shabbat Services: 10:00 AM followed by a delicious kiddush.

hebrew school

      ~ 2014-2015 REGISTRATION NOW OPEN ~

Hebrew school begins September 7

chabad hebrew school

Chabad Hebrew School offers a Jewish education that’s stimulating, hands-on and meaningful. Chabad, with its non-judgmental approach, embraces all children regardless of their affiliation or their level of observance. The focus is to instill Jewish pride and a strong Jewish identity in the children. The teachers are passionate about what they teach and are living role models.

A significant ingredient of our program is making Judaism exciting and fun for the children. Thus, children love coming to Chabad Hebrew School.

No child will be turned away due to financial difficulties.

 

rosh hashana banner

High Holiday Services with Chabad

at the Mercury Grand Hotel

 

Dear Friends, 

 

Don’t be judgmental. Unless, of course, you happen to be a judge. Then it’s your job.

 

This week’s Torah portion, Parshat Shoftim, begins with the biblical command for judges to be appointed in every city and town to adjudicate and maintain a just, ordered, civil society. Interestingly, it occurs in the first week of Elul, the month in which we are to prepare in earnest for the Days of Judgment ahead, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.

 

There are, however, some significant differences between earthly judges of flesh and blood and the heavenly judge. In the earthly court, if after a fair trial a defendant is found guilty, then there’s really not much room for clemency on the part of the judge. The law is the law and must take its course. The accused may shed rivers of tears, but no human judge can be certain if his remorse is genuine. His feelings of regret are touching, but of limited legal consequence. After all, a human judge may only make a decision based on “what the eye can see.” The misdeed was seen to have been committed. The remorse, who knows? Perhaps he’s a good actor and is only acting contrite. The Supreme Judge, however, does know whether the accused genuinely regrets his actions or is merely putting on an act. Therefore, He alone is able to forgive. That is why in heavenly judgments, teshuvah (repentance) is effective.

 

The Maharal of Prague gave another reason. Only G-d is able to judge the whole person. Every one of us has good and bad to some extent. Even those who have sinned may have many other good deeds that outweigh the bad ones. Perhaps even one good deed was of such major significance that it alone could serve as a weighty counterbalance. The point is, only G-d knows. Only He can judge the individual in the context of his whole life and all his deeds, good and bad.

 

Our goal is to emulate the heavenly court. We should try to look at the totality of the person. You think he is bad, but is he all bad? Does he have no redeeming virtues? Surely, he must have some good in him as well. Look at the whole person.

 

A teacher once conducted an experiment. He held up a white plate and showed it to the class. In the center of the plate was a small black spot. He then asked the class to describe what they saw. One student said he saw a black spot. Another said it must be a target for shooting practice. A third suggested that the plate was dirty or damaged. Whereupon the teacher asked, “Doesn’t anyone see a white plate?”

 

There may have been a small black spot, but essentially it was a white plate. Why do we only see the dirt? Let us learn to find the good in others. Nobody is perfect, not even ourselves. Let’s not be so judgmental and critical. Let’s try to see the good in others.

Shabbat Shalom, 

Rabbi Yacov & Hindy Borenstein

http://www.chabadmidhudsonvalley.com  

Jewish Humor!

Joke.jpg

Once, a salesman approached a home and heard a big commotion inside. When the door was opened by a man, the salesman asked if he could speak to the master of the home.

“Well, sir,” came the reply, “you will have to wait around a bit; we are deciding just that right at this moment.”

The New Extension to the Chabad Center
chabad house
To view it in full scale, click on image.
If you wish to dedicate or contribute for the New Bais Chabad Center please call the Rabbi for an appointment.
The Rebbe
rebbe

To learn more about the Rebbe, click on the picture above.

 Candle Lighting Times

 for
 Poughkeepsie, NY   
Shabbat Candles
Friday, August 29 

 
Light Candles at
7:16 PM
Shabbat ends at:
8:15 PM
Upcoming Events
Shabbat Services 

10:00 AM
followed by a delecious kiddush

 

Sunday morning services:
Bagels, Lox & Torah
 Service 9:30 AM
Breakfast 10:00 AM
at the Chabad Center
 
Women’s Torah class:
Torah and Tea
Wednesday’s 10:00 AM
at the Borenstein’s home
Quick Links
Donate Now
Donate Now
Join Our Mailing List
Mazal Tov
chabad house
If you would like to include a Mazal Tov please call
(845) 463-5801
or e-mail: chabadmidhudsonvly@prodigy.net
Mikvah
Ask The Rabbi
You have a question?

Ask the Rabbi,
email
or call
(845) 463-5801

Posted in Chabad Lubavitch of Mid-Hudson Valley, Dutchess county, Jewish, Poughkeepsie, prayer, religion | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Shabbat Shalom! RJC 8/28/2014

Rhinebeck Jewish Center

Upcoming Events
———————————–

Kiddush Club 
Shabbat Day
Services 9:30 AM
Followed by a delicious Kiddush
102 Montgomery St., Rhinebeck NY 12572

 

Hebrew School

The RJC’s proud to announce the launch of Hebrew School!
Details to be announced, stay tuned!

Greetings!
We would like to wish you and yours a wonderful Labor Day Weekend. Please join us for Services Friday Night (7:15 PM) and Minyan on Shabbat Day (9:30 AM).
We’ve had such a successful Summer and are looking forward to an amazing Fall season! Stay tuned for our upcoming programs and events!

Shabbat Shalom,
Rabbi Hanoch and Tzivie Hecht

 

Short Thought:

Our hands did not spill this blood, and our eyes did not see… (21:7) But would it enter one’s mind that the elders of the court are murderers? Rather, [they declare:] We did not see him and let him depart without food or escort.

(Talmud, Sotah 45a)

The principle behind the law of Eglah Arufah is that a person is also responsible for what occurs outside of his domain — outside of the areas where he is fully in control. When a murdered traveler is found out in the field, the elders of the nearest city must go out there and bring the Eglah Arufah to atone for the crime, although it occurred “outside of their jurisdiction”; for it was nevertheless their responsibility to send the traveler off with adequate provision and protection.

The same applies on the personal level in all areas of life. A person never has the right to say, “This is outside of my element. I have no obligation to deal with this.” If it is something that, by Divine Providence, one has been made aware of, that means that there is something one can, and must, do to positively influence the end result.

(The Lubavitcher Rebbe)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Humor

A rabbi, a priest and a minister are discussing when life begins.

The priest says: “In our religion, life begins at conception.”

The minister says: “We disagree. We believe that life begins when the fetus is viable outside of the mother’s womb.”

The rabbi responds: “You both are wrong. In our religion, life begins when all of the children are married off.”

Announcements
Please say Tehilim for a complete Refuah Shelemah for our friends:

 Mr.Curtis Katz . Hebrew name: Tzadok Hacohen ben Esther
Mrs. Barbara Glazer : Baila Gittel bas Mindel
Menachem Mendel ben Menucha Rochel
Huna Yael ben Mindel
Mindel Bayla Bas Chana Esther
Simone Pearl Pincus Har-Even, Hebrew name: Sima bas Mindel

May we only share good news!

Please contact us to have a Mazal Tov or Announcement placed here to share with the community.
845.876.7666 or Rabbi@sixminuterabbi.com

Candle Lighting Times:  
Friday, August 29
Light Candles at: 7:16 pm
Shabbat, August 30
Shabbat Ends: 8:15 pm
If you or someone you know are in need of candles and/or information about lighting Shabbat candles, please contact the RJC at 845.876.7666 
Chabad offers a wide range of programs for the entire Jewish community. No membership is necessary, and we welcome all — regardless of affiliation or background.

Chabad provides a non-judgmental, welcoming environment for Jewish families and individuals to explore our rich heritage.

Posted in Chabad Dutchess, Dutchess county, Jewish, Mid-Hudson Valley, Red Hook, religion, religious services, Rhinebeck, Rhinebeck House's of Worship, Rhinebeck Jewish Center, Village of Rhinebeck | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Prayer quote from E.M. Bounds

Prayer quote from E.M. Bounds

Originally posted on Christian Resource Ministry:

IMG_1714.JPG

View original

Posted in Christian, Red Hook, religion, Rhinebeck | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Why Do Good Things Happen to Bad People?

news1-15-10

Chabad of Mid-Hudson Valley Newsletter

Friday, August 22, 2014
Av 26, 5774
Parshat Re’ei
Pirkei Avot: Chapter 6

Blessing of New Month

       logo                       B”H 


A word from the Rabbi


Shabbat Services: 10:00 AM followed by a delicious kiddush.

hebrew school

      ~ 2014-2015 REGISTRATION NOW OPEN ~

chabad hebrew school

Chabad Hebrew School offers a Jewish education that’s stimulating, hands-on and meaningful. Chabad, with its non-judgmental approach, embraces all children regardless of their affiliation or their level of observance. The focus is to instill Jewish pride and a strong Jewish identity in the children. The teachers are passionate about what they teach and are living role models.

 

A significant ingredient of our program is making Judaism exciting and fun for the children, because for many children this is their only connection to Judaism, and we would like that as adults these children will reflect positively on their experience and be eager to provide their children with the same opportunity. Thus, children love coming to Chabad Hebrew School.

 

No child will be turned away due to financial difficulties.

 

Dear Friends, 

 

In this week’s Torah portion, Parshat Re’eh, (Deuteronomy 11:26-16:17) it talks about a false prophet. There are three steps in this scenario:

1) “If there will arise among you a prophet, or a dreamer of a dream, and he gives you a sign or a wonder, 2) and the sign or the wonder of which he spoke to you happens, 3) [and he] says, ‘Let us go after other gods which you have not known, and let us worship them.'” Then, G-d concludes, 4) “You shall not heed the words of that prophet, or that dreamer of a dream; for the L-rd, your God, is testing you, to know whether you really love the L-rd, your God, with all your heart and with all your soul” (13:2-4).

 

A good old con-artist is one thing, but this prophet guy really comes through. And then, based on his proven track record, it is only logical to follow his lead. Unfortunately, he steers his followers away from G-d.

 

Chassidic masters use this description of the false prophet to resolve an age old conundrum: Why do bad things happen to good people, and good things to bad people (like the popular guy who walks all over people, or the millionaire who is fraudulent in business)? What bothers us most about this injustice is that it simply confuses us. Why would G-d back up the false prophet by validating his prediction? Why would G-d reward an immoral person with success?

It makes us doubt the validity of our own moral compass. If that person achieved success, maybe I should forgo my scruples and play by his rules. The false prophet has proven his success, and those around him will naturally follow his lead.

 

Indeed, the question is puzzling. Why does G-d allow sinful people to prosper? Of course, it is hard to know who is truly happy and prosperous. What appears to be a life of perfection and bliss may look quite different from the inside. But, still, why would G-d make the sinner appear to prosper and initiate a crisis of faith in those around him?

 

And so the Torah concludes, “G-d is testing you to know whether you really love Him.”

 

If reward and punishment were so transparent then there would be no test. Following in G-d’s ways would be the most logical and beneficial decision one could make. But when G-d’s justice seems askew, it becomes more challenging to make G-d-centered decisions. So G-d tests the waters to measure the depth of our love. Do you love Me? Do you trust Me? Or are you only in it for you?

 

There is one final question to be asked. If He really is G-d, does He really need to test us to know whether or not we love Him? Can’t He read our hearts like an open book? The third Chabad Rebbe, the Tzemach Tzedek, answers this question. The test is not so much for G-d to know us, as it is for us to know G-d, to breed “daat,” an intimate knowledge of G-d’s omnipotence. Within every false prophet, within each test of faith, G-d plants a seed. When we remain firm in our belief despite the evidence that success lies outside of G-d, the shell of the test simply falls away and the seed emerges. This seed is the gift of deep, intimate knowledge.

 

We don’t go looking for tests. But if they come our way, we should appreciate that it is critical to our success as G-dly human beings and committed Jews that we face up to the challenge.

Shabbat Shalom, 

Rabbi Yacov & Hindy Borenstein

http://www.chabadmidhudsonvalley.com ; 

Jewish Humor!

Joke.jpg

At the height of a political corruption trial, the prosecuting attorney attacked a witness. “Isn’t it true,” he bellowed, “that you accepted five thousand dollars to compromise this case?”

The witness stared out the window, as though he hadn’t heard the question.

“Isn’t it true that you accepted five thousand dollars to compromise this case?” the lawyer repeated.

The witness still did not respond.

Finally, the judge leaned over and said, “Sir, please answer the question.”

 

“Oh,” the startled witness said, “I thought he was talking to you.”

The New Extension to the Chabad Center
chabad house
To view it in full scale, click on image.
If you wish to dedicate or contribute for the New Bais Chabad Center please call the Rabbi for an appointment.
The Rebbe
rebbe

To learn more about the Rebbe, click on the picture above.

 Candle Lighting Times

 for
 Poughkeepsie, NY   
Shabbat Candles
Friday, August 22 

 
Light Candles at
7:27 PM
Shabbat ends at:
8:27 PM
Upcoming Events
Shabbat Services 

10:00 AM
followed by a delecious kiddush

 

Sunday morning services:
Bagels, Lox & Torah
 Service 9:30 AM
Breakfast 10:00 AM
at the Chabad Center
 
Women’s Torah class:
Torah and Tea
Wednesday’s 10:00 AM
at the Borenstein’s home
Quick Links
Donate Now
Donate Now
Join Our Mailing List
Mazal Tov
chabad house
If you would like to include a Mazal Tov please call
(845) 463-5801
or e-mail: chabadmidhudsonvly@prodigy.net
Mikvah
Ask The Rabbi
You have a question?

Ask the Rabbi,
email
or call
(845) 463-5801
Posted in Chabad Lubavitch of Mid-Hudson Valley, Chabad Mid Hudson Valley, events, Jewish, Mid-Hudson Valley, religion, religious services | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Shabbat Shalom! RJC 8/21/2014

Posted in Jewish, religion, religious services, Rhinebeck, Rhinebeck House's of Worship, Rhinebeck Jewish Center | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

What Will The World Say?

news1-15-10

Chabad of Mid-Hudson Valley Newsletter

Friday, August 15, 2014
Av 19, 5773
Parshat Eikev
Pirkei Avot: Chapter 5

       logo                       B”H 


A word from the Rabbi


hebrew school
~ 2014-2015 REGISTRATION NOW OPEN ~

chabad hebrew school

Chabad Hebrew School offers a Jewish education that’s stimulating, hands-on and meaningful. Chabad, with its non-judgmental approach, embraces all children regardless of their affiliation or their level of observance. The focus is to instill Jewish pride and a strong Jewish identity in the children. The teachers are passionate about what they teach and are living role models.

 

A significant ingredient of our program is making Judaism exciting and fun for the children, because for many children this is their only connection to Judaism, and we would like that as adults these children will reflect positively on their experience and be eager to provide their children with the same opportunity. Thus, children love coming to Chabad Hebrew School.

 

No child will be turned away due to financial difficulties.

 

Shabbat Services: No Shabbat Services this week, see you next week.

 

Dear Friends, 

 

Much has been said and written about   the galut mentality, the subservience felt by generations of Jews living in the Diaspora. As second-class citizens for so many generations in Eastern Europe and in the Arab countries, Jews, allegedly, came to lose their self-esteem. Finally, in our own time, the old ghetto Jew would be replaced with a proud, strong, independent Israeli. No more would Moshke the Jew cower before his

poretz, the country squire. Jews would now walk tall.

In this week’s Torah portion, Parshat Eikev, Moses reminds his people never to forget that it was G-d who took them out of Egypt and who led them through the wilderness into the Promised Land. And he describes the wilderness as “that great and awesome desert.” (8:14-15) The wilderness before we reach the Promised Land represents the state of exile. And the problem with this wilderness is that we are impressed with it. In our eyes it is “great.” The big, wide world out there is great, powerful, and all too overwhelming to the Jew.

We forget that the real galut mentality is not confined to those living in an eighteenth-century ghetto. The real exile is the exile within our own heads and hearts – the exile in considering the non-Jewish world to be so great. When we attach so much significance to the outside world, then we are still living in a state of exile and with a galut mindset, no matter where we may be geographically.

And once we start attaching greatness to this wilderness, our sense of self-worth is further eroded and we begin considering this wilderness not only “great” but also “awesome,” even terrifying.

But why? The new Israel was supposed to be different. No more weakness, no more cowardice, gone with the old world syndromes. So why do we still care what they say? If we are convinced that justice and morality are with us, then it shouldn’t bother us what others may say. If they have a problem with an Israel that can defend itself and stand up and fight its own battles, then that’s their problem, not ours. We will do what we need to do.

Why should I respect a world that has so lost its moral bearings that genocide in Darfur goes unnoticed and the most “immoral” country on the globe is an Israel that defends its civilian population from rocket attacks? Why do we suffer anxiety attacks every time the United Nations condemns us?

The answer is because the big, wide world is the wilderness we live in. And that wilderness is perceived by us as “great and awesome.” And as long as a corrupt, hypocritical, morally bankrupt world impresses us we will continue to be demoralized by its negative opinion of us.

The Torah is telling us: Know, Jew, that there is nothing whatsoever to be impressed with – that this world is nothing but a wilderness, and a moral wilderness at that.  The princes of the wilderness society are paupers of the spirit. Anti-Semitism is a fact of life and the sooner we accept that reality, the healthier and saner we will all be. By all means, wage the diplomatic war; do battle with media bias. But don’t fret if you fail to turn around public opinion.

Remember that the first step in leaving the exile is to stop being impressed or intimidated by it. In order to redeem our land and our people, we must first redeem our own souls and our own self-respect. May we never forget where our true strength lies. When we remember who took us out of Egypt and led us through the wilderness, and who the great and awesome Being of Beings is and that He is our strength  Then we will be able to truly walk tall and stand proud,  forever.

Shabbat Shalom, 

Rabbi Yacov & Hindy Borenstein

http://www.chabadmidhudsonvalley.com  

Jewish Humor!

Joke.jpg

I

n an all-Jewish school, a Russian man decided to disrupt a math class. 

He stormed in and cried, “You Jews think you’re so smart, try and answer this! There are seven trains going all around the country with sixteen cars on each train. There are thirty-three people on each car. How old am I?”

No one responds. A boy in the back stands up and says, “48.” 
Amazed, the Russian says “Yes! How did you know?”

The boy replied, “There’s a man in our villiage that’s twenty-four and is only half meshugah.”

The New Extension to the Chabad Center
chabad house
To view it in full scale, click on image.
If you wish to dedicate or contribute for the New Bais Chabad Center please call the Rabbi for an appointment.
The Rebbe
rebbe

To learn more about the Rebbe, click on the picture above.

 Candle Lighting Times

 for
 Poughkeepsie, NY   
Shabbat Candles
Friday, August 15 

 
Light Candles at
7:38 PM
Shabbat ends at:
8:39 PM
Upcoming Events
Shabbat Services 

10:00 AM
followed by a delecious kiddush

 

Sunday morning services:
Bagels, Lox & Torah
 Service 9:30 AM
Breakfast 10:00 AM
at the Chabad Center
 
Women’s Torah class:
Torah and Tea
Wednesday’s 10:00 AM
at the Borenstein’s home
Quick Links
Donate Now
Donate Now
Join Our Mailing List
Mazal Tov
chabad house
If you would like to include a Mazal Tov please call
(845) 463-5801
or e-mail: chabadmidhudsonvly@prodigy.net
Mikvah
Ask The Rabbi
You have a question?

Ask the Rabbi,
email
or call
(845) 463-5801
Posted in Chabad Lubavitch of Mid-Hudson Valley, Chabad Mid Hudson Valley, Jewish, religion, religious services | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

To Know He is Watching Over us

To Know He is Watching Over us

Originally posted on Naomi Fata:

How many of us know the familiar hymn ‘His Eye is on the Sparrow‘?

When Jesus is my portion
A constant friend is he
His eye is on the sparrow
And I know he watches over me
His eye is on the sparrow
And I know he watches me

In the past few weeks I have had several instances in which I so clearly felt His tender loving care over me. All of them are everyday, aspects of life and yet I knew my Father was pouring His love out on me!

The Little Red Wagon

IMG_1712All summer I have been stopping by yard sales to find a little red wagon for the kids. My husband loves the vintage ones rather than the newer plastic version. In the midst of looking I had been telling the Lord I didn’t want to spend a ton of money on one…

View original 610 more words

Posted in Christian, God, Red Hook, religion, Rhinebeck | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment