Painting for sale

A painting on canvas, signed and professionally framed.

CAM00087

$250.00 OBO. All offers considered.

Contact for details

Phone: Ariana @ (845) 389-8674

Email: ariana@boudica.us

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Visit Love Stitches By Naomi

Click image for online store

or click here to visit on face book.

Posted in Business, Dutchess county, Mid-Hudson Valley, Red Hook, Red Hook Business, Rhinebeck, Rhinebeck Business, Uncategorized, Village of Rhinebeck | Leave a comment

Reminder:Sunday Annual BBQ!

Rhinebeck Jewish Center

Kosher Community Barbeque!

This Sunday, July 27th at 12:00 PM

At the Red Hook Recreational Park Pavillion

The BBQ is free as always and open to the entire community! Bring friends and family and join us for a fun summer afternoon of grilling and fun!

RSVP is appreciated.

See you there!

Rhinebeck Jewish Center
102 Montgomery Street
Rhinebeck, NY 12572
845.876.7666

info@RhinebeckJewishCenter.com

Visit our website for the full flyer
Find us on Facebook
Join the Rhinebeck Jewish Center Facebook group and stay updated on upcoming events!
Posted in BBQ, Chabad Dutchess, events, Jewish, Rhinebeck House's of Worship, Rhinebeck Jewish Center | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Is His Presence our Hope?

Is His Presence our Hope?

Originally posted on Naomi Fata:

20140717-062739-23259815.jpg

 

 

You are the light of the world. A city on a hill cannot be hidden.  Neither do people light a lamp and put it under a bowl. Instead they put it on its stand, and it gives light to everyone in the house.  In the same way, let your light shine before men, that they may see your good deeds and praise your Father in heaven. Matthew 5:14-16

What is your concept of these verses?

(1)    Does this give you an overwhelming sense of responsibility? Do you feel like it means you have to live a perfect life so that through your perfection people will see God?

 

(2)    Or is this a verse of glorious hope and of promise? When we receive Christ as Savior we have Christ in us the hope of glory.  Isn’t He the great light that shines from within? All Scripture points to Christ as the Light of the world…

View original 334 more words

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Promises, Promises, Promises . . .

news1-15-10

Chabad Banner

Chabad of Mid-Hudson Valley Newsletter

Friday July 18, 2014
  
Tammuz 20, 5774

Parshat Matot

Pirkei Avot, Chapter 1

 

A word from the Rabbi

Shabbat Services: Shabbat Services 10:00 AM.

This week’s Kiddush is being sponsored by Barry Kleinman in honor of his dear sister, Dorothy Kleinman’s, yartzeit. May her memory be for a blessing!

Please make a special effort to join us for the minyan

as special Prayers will also be recited for the safety and security of our People in Israel and especially for the soldiers of the IDF who are now fighting a difficult battle. May G-d Almighty grant them tremendous success and Heavenly blessings  for the success of their mission and may each and every one of them return home safely to their families.

To our dear soldiers: WE SALUTE YOU!  YOUR COURAGE AND WILLINGNESS TO RISK YOUR LIVES FOR THE SAFETY OF OUR PEOPLE AND OUR LAND IS AWE INSPIRING! YOUR PEOPLE ARE WITH YOU AND PRAYING FOR EACH AND EVERY ONE OF YOU!

We ask all Jewish women and girls to light Shabbat candles at 8:13 tonight on time. 

The Rebbe always emphasized that the acrostics (Roshei Teivot) of the words NEIROT SHABBAT KODESH (candles of the Holy Shabbat) spell the word “NESHEK”, which means ammunition, as the lighting of Shabbat candles is a spiritual ammunition to protect our people.
Please remember to give some tzedaka (charity) before candle lighting.
Men over Bar Mitzvah should try to put on Tefillin today and/or Sunday (not on Shabbat) as Tefillin is a Mitzvah specifically connected with the safety and security of our Holy Land.  
             
  Jewish Art Calendar

jewish art calendar 2013

Be Part of it!
The Jewish Art Calendar is one of the most popular Jewish publications and serves as a Jewish lifeline to many thousands of Jewish families throughout the Mid Hudson Valley with a wealth of Jewish knowledge, Holiday awareness, recipes as well as beautiful artwork. throughout the entire region and well beyond.

We ask you to please place an ad or make a contribution in any amount toward the Jewish Art Calendar. Donations in the amount of Chai ($36, $54, $180 or more) or any amount you can afford. Your name(s) will be listed on the page of contributors, or, if you so wish, you can be listed anonymously. Donations can also be made in the memory, or in honor, of a loved one.

Please send in your contribution or advertisement today to:

The Jewish Art Calendar

Chabad Lubavitch of Mid Hudson Valley

63 Vassar Rd.

Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 12603

You can also donate through PayPal by clicking here.

Please e-mail an exact listing of names you wish to list or advertisement through e-mailing us at chabadmidhudsonvly@prodigy.net

Thanking you in advance for your help and support.

Dear Friends:

I have always been intrigued by the traditional way in which diamond merchants seal a deal. They shake hands and say “Mazel and Brocha” (“good fortune and blessing”). Once those few words have been said, the deal is done and it has all the power of a legal, contractual transaction.

It is a tribute to the diamond fraternity that in their industry, a word is a word. In some other industries, even a contract isn’t worth the paper it’s written on. Here, the spoken word is deemed to be binding and irrevocable. Interestingly, the “Mazel and Brocha” principle has been upheld in arbitration cases throughout the world.

This week’s Torah portion, Matot, opens with an injunction about the sanctity of our words: “And Moses spoke to the heads of the tribes . . . if a man takes a vow . . . he shall not desecrate his word; whatever issues from his mouth he shall do . . .” (Numbers 30:2-3).

A word is a word. Promises are promises. And the words we utter are sacred and inviolate. If we disregard what we say, we have profaned and desecrated our words. That is why many people are careful to add the words bli neder-”without vowing”-whenever they say something that might be construed as a vow, so that, should they be prevented from fulfilling what they expressed their intention to do, this would not constitute the grave offense of violating a vow. This, of course, in no way diminishes the regard we hold for our words, and the need to carry out one’s promises even if one stipulated that it is not a vow.

The question is: Why was this commandment given to the “heads of the tribes”? Surely, it applies to each and every one of us. A simple answer is that since it is usually leaders who make the most promises, it is they who need the most cautioning.

Politicians are infamous for campaign promises, which-once they are elected-are rarely fulfilled. They tell about a candidate who promised to lower taxes if he were elected. As soon as he took office, he raised taxes. When he was challenged by the people about his unkept promise, he actually admitted that he had lied. The naïve electorate thought that was quite a genuine confession, and promptly decided that he was the most honest politician they had ever met. We are a gullible people indeed.

Many books have been published on the subject of business ethics. While there are a great many laws and nuances to this theme, at the end of the day, the acid test of business ethics is, “Did you keep your word?” Did you carry out your commitments, or did you duck and dive around them? It makes no difference how other companies are behaving. It matters little whether our competitors are corrupt. We must honor our promises, and that is the ultimate bottom line.

Whether in our business relationships or in the tzedakah pledges we make to the synagogue or to other charities, our word should be our bond. Even if we are worried about the immediate financial costs, we can be assured that, with the passage of time, the reputation we will acquire by speaking truthfully and keeping our word will more than compensate any short-term losses.

Leave the spin doctoring to the politicians. A Jew’s word should be sacred.

 

Shabbat Shalom,

Rabbi Yacov & Hindy Borenstein
www.chabdmidhudsonvalley.com 

Joke.jpg

JEWISH HUMOR!
Although Monty runs his own company, in recent weeks, during his regular morning meetings, a growing number of his staff were openly disagreeing with his plans and some were even quite rude to him.
So next morning, he puts up a big shiny sign on the firm’s notice board. It reads: -
I AM THE BOSS
AND DON’T EVER FORGET IT!
Later that day, when he returns from lunch, he sees that someone has stuck a note under his sign. The note reads, “Your wife called. She said she wants her sign back ASAP!”

The New Extension to the Chabad Center
chabad house
To view it in full scale, click on image.
If you wish to dedicate or contribute for the New Bais Chabad Center please call the Rabbi for an appointment.
The Rebbe
rebbe

To learn more about the Rebbe, click on the picture above.

     Candle Lighting Times

 for
 Poughkeepsie, NY

 

Shabbat Candles
Friday, July 18

 
Light Candles at:
8:09 PM
Shabbat ends at:
9:15 PM
Upcoming Events
Shabbat Services 

10:00 AM
followed by a delecious kiddush

Sunday morning services:
Bagels, Lox & Torah
 Service 9:30 AM
Breakfast 10:00 AM
at the Chabad Center
 
Women’s Torah class:
Torah and Tea
Wednesday’s 10:00 AM
at the Borenstein’s home
Quick Links
Donate Now
Donate Now
Join Our Mailing List
Mazal Tov
chabad house
If you would like to include a Mazal Tov please call
(845) 463-5801
or e-mail: chabadmidhudsonvly@prodigy.net
Mikvah
Ask The Rabbi
You have a question?

Ask the Rabbi,
email
or call
(845) 463-5801

Posted in Chabad Lubavitch of Mid-Hudson Valley, Dutchess county, events, Jewish, Poughkeepsie | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Shabbat Shalom! RJC 7/17/2014

Rhinebeck Jewish Center

Upcoming Events
———————————–

Kiddush Club 
Shabbat Day
Services 9:30 AM
Followed by a delicious Kiddush
102 Montgomery St., Rhinebeck NY 12572
Shabbaton: How Dating Works In The Hasidic Community – Lecture by

Rabbi Hanoch and Rebbetzin Tzivie Hecht
Services 7:00 PM, Dinner 7:30 PM
Friday night July 11th 2014

Annual Kosher Family BBQ

Our annual summer BBQ lunch: Sunday July 27th 2014 at 4:00 PM

Annual Cantorial

Shabbat

Renowned Cantor Yaron Levy will lead a melodious and inspirational Shabbat: Friday August 8th – Services 7:00 PM, Dinner and Lecture 7:30 PM
Shabbat August 9th – Services 9:30 AM

Israeli Culture Day
Sunday August 17th, 12:00 PM @ the RJC: Authentic Israeli Lunch featuring Falafel, Shwarma, Pita, Hummus, Salads and more accompanied by Israeli music and atmosphere.

Greetings!  
We hope to see you tomorrow night at our Shabbaton: How Dating Works In The Hasidic Community. Rabbi and Rebbetzin will share their story and answer all your questions. Services at 7 PM, Dinner and Lecture at 7:30 PM at the RJC.
Shabbat Shalom,
Rabbi Hanoch and Tzivie Hecht

Short Thought:

The Three Weeks: July 15 – August 5

The Three Weeks is an annual mourning period that falls out in the summer. This is when we mourn the destruction of the Holy Temple and our launch into a still-ongoing exile.

The period begins on the 17th of the Hebrew month of Tammuz, a fast day that marks the day when the walls of Jerusalem were breached by the Romans in 69 CE.

It reaches its climax and concludes with the fast of the 9th of Av, the date when both Holy Temples were set aflame. This is the saddest day of the Jewish calendar, and it is also the date of other tragedies spanning our nation’s history.

Observances:

There are various mourning-related customs and observances that are followed for the entire three-week period (until midday of the 10th of the Hebrew month of Av, or-if that date falls on Friday-the morning of that day). We do not cut our hair, purchase new clothes, or listen to music. No weddings are held.

17 Tammuz is a fast day, on which we refrain from eating and drinking from dawn to nightfall.

The final Nine Days of the Three Weeks are a time of intensified mourning. Starting on the first of Av, we refrain from eating meat or drinking wine, and from wearing freshly laundered clothes.

9 Av is a more stringent fast than 17 Tammuz. It begins at sunset of the previous evening, when we gather in the synagogue to read the Book of Lamentations. Besides fasting, we abstain from additional pleasures: washing, applying lotions or creams, wearing leather shoes, and marital relations. Until midday, we sit on the floor or on low stools.

There is more to the Three Weeks than fasting and lamentation. Our sages tell us that those who mourn the destruction of Jerusalem will merit seeing it rebuilt with the coming of Moshiach. May that day come soon, and then all the mournful dates on the calendar will be transformed into days of tremendous joy and happiness.

Humor  

Shlomo Hadad walks into his favorite bar in downtown Tel-Aviv only to find a horse serving drinks. The horse asks, “What are you staring at? Haven’t you ever seen a horse tending bar before?”

“It’s not that,” Shlomo responds. “I just never thought Itzik would sell the place.”


Announcements
Please say Tehilim for a complete Refuah Shelemah for our friends:
 Mr.Curtis Katz . Hebrew name: Tzadok Hacohen ben Esther
Mrs. Barbara Glazer : Baila Gittel bas Mindel
Menachem Mendel ben Menucha Rochel
Huna Yael ben Mindel
Mindel Bayla Bas Chana Esther
Simone Pearl Pincus Har-Even, Hebrew name: Sima bas Mindel
May we only share good news!
Please contact us to have a Mazal Tov or Announcement placed here to share with the community.
845.876.7666 or Rabbi@sixminuterabbi.com
Candle Lighting Times:  
Friday, July 18
Light Candles at: 8:10 pm
Shabbat, July 19
Shabbat Ends: 9:17 pm
If you or someone you know are in need of candles and/or information about lighting Shabbat candles, please contact the RJC at 845.876.7666 
Chabad offers a wide range of programs for the entire Jewish community. No membership is necessary, and we welcome all — regardless of affiliation or background.

Chabad provides a non-judgmental, welcoming environment for Jewish families and individuals to explore our rich heritage.

 
Posted in Chabad Dutchess, events, Jewish, Rhinebeck House's of Worship, Rhinebeck Jewish Center | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Discerning the Voice of guilt: False Guilt versus the Conviction of the Spirit

Discerning the Voice of guilt: False Guilt versus the Conviction of the Spirit

Originally posted on Naomi Fata:

guilt

How often do you hear yourself or someone else saying,  “ I just feel so guilty for not______________”?

Many times we fill in that blank with something we feel we should be doing but aren’t doing or some area we feel we aren’t measuring up to a standard (God’s or men’s).

Among women I find this to be more prominent than men – maybe because guilt is imprinted on our hearts since Eve first ate the forbidden fruit and so for that rest time women feel like it is our fault – we aren’t good enough – the enemy grabs onto our floundering emotions and continues to speak these lies into our minds.

As women we have a standard of perfection – the perfect house – the perfect kids – involvement in every activity under the sun (whether in church or out of church) – if our kids are lagging…

View original 874 more words

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The Importance of Guarding Our Hearts

The Importance of Guarding Our Hearts

Originally posted on Naomi Fata:

 

 

20140710-060203-21723943.jpgHow important do you think it is to guard one’s heart?

God is a God of the heart. He knows that our spiritual lives flow from our inner man or the heart.

A favorite saying in the world is ‘Listen to Your Heart’ or Follow your Heart’ but the Biblical truth says  ‘The heart is deceitful above all things and beyond cure. Who can understand it?’ (Jeremiah 17:9 NIV) Ever since the Fall of Man, the heart has been under attack.  Once we are saved he can’t change our eternal destiny but he can do his best to keep us from fellowship with God.

When our hearts are living in darkness we don’t fellowship experience fellowship with God as I John 1:6 says ‘if we claim to have fellowship with him and yet walk in the darkness, we lie and do not live out the truth.’

I spent…

View original 484 more words

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Shabbat Shalom! RJC 7/10/2014

Rhinebeck Jewish Center

Upcoming Events
———————————–

Kiddush Club 
Shabbat Day
Services 9:30 AM
Followed by a delicious Kiddush
102 Montgomery St., Rhinebeck NY 12572

Shabbaton: How Dating Works In The Hasidic Community – Lecture by

Rabbi Hanoch and Rebbetzin Tzivie Hecht
Services 7:00 PM, Dinner 7:30 PM
Friday night July 11th 2014

Holocaust Memorial Movie Night

“Portrait of Wally”
Sunday July 13th. 7:30 PM. $12 per person
At the Starr Library in Rhinebeck

Annual Kosher Family BBQ

Our annual summer BBQ lunch: Sunday July 27th 2014 at 4:00 PM

Annual Cantorial

Shabbat

Renowned Cantor Yaron Levy will lead a melodious and inspirational Shabbat: Friday August 8th – Services 7:00 PM, Dinner and Lecture 7:30 PM
Shabbat August 9th – Services 9:30 AM

Israeli Culture Day
Sunday August 17th, 12:00 PM @ the RJC: Authentic Israeli Lunch featuring Falafel, Shwarma, Pita, Hummus, Salads and more accompanied by Israeli music and atmosphere.

Greetings!  
We hope you’re staying hydrated and cool during this very warm month. Join us in the air conditioned Starr Library for Movie Night featuring the film “A Portrait Of Wally”, an inspirational motion picture. Sunday evening at 7:30 PM in the Starr Library in Rhinebeck. Admission is $12 per person. Bring a friend and see you there!
Shabbat Shalom,
Rabbi Hanoch and Tzivie Hecht

Short Thought:

You shall observe to offer it to Me in its appointed time, two each day, a regular offering (28:2-3)

The “appointed time” of the regular offerings is every day.

(Rashi)

The communal offerings include temiddin–”regular” or “perpetual” offerings brought each day in the same format–and mussafin–”additional” offerings brought on special occasions (Shabbat, Rosh Chodesh, the festivals) which differ in accordance with the nature of the day.

In our own lives there also exists this division: there are the “routine” things, such as the fifteen breaths we take each minute and the job we troop to each workday; and there are the “special” things we do once in a while or once in a lifetime. Both are crucial to a fulfilling and satisfing life. The offerings–and their present-day substitute, prayer–include both temiddin and mussafin, to teach us that our relationship with G-d should likewise embrace the surety of the routine on the one hand, and the excitement of the occasional on the other.

But when speaking of the two daily offerings, the Torah uses the term mo’ed, “appointed time”–a phrase generally reserved for the festivals and other occasionally occurring observances. This means that the Torah also urges us to transcend these categorizations and experience a sense of specialty and occasion also in the “regular” rhythms of life. As Rashi comments on the verse, “The ‘appointed time’ of the regular offerings is every day.”

(From the teachings of the Lubavitcher Rebbe)

Humor  

One Shabbat  morning, the rabbi noticed little Nathan staring at the memorial plaques in  the lobby of the synagogue.
They were covered with names, and American  flags stood on both sides.
The seven-year old boy had been staring at the  plaques for some time, so the rabbi walked up and said quietly, “Shabbat  shalom, Nathan.”
“Shabbat shalom, Rabbi.”
The rabbi lingered a little  longer.
“Rabbi?”
“Yes, son?”
“What is this?”
“It’s a memorial,  Nathan, to all the young men and women who died in the  service.”
“Oh.”
Silently, they stood together, staring at the  plaques.
Then little Nathan whispered, “Was it the Friday night or the  Shabbat morning service?”


Announcements
Please say Tehilim for a complete Refuah Shelemah for our friends:

 Mr.Curtis Katz . Hebrew name: Tzadok Hacohen ben Esther
Mrs. Barbara Glazer : Baila Gittel bas Mindel
Menachem Mendel ben Menucha Rochel
Huna Yael ben Mindel
Mindel Bayla Bas Chana Esther

May we only share good news!

Please contact us to have a Mazal Tov or Announcement placed here to share with the community.
845.876.7666 or Rabbi@sixminuterabbi.com

Candle Lighting Times:  
Friday, July 11
Light Candles at: 8:14 pm
Shabbat, July 12
Shabbat Ends: 9:22 pm
If you or someone you know are in need of candles and/or information about lighting Shabbat candles, please contact the RJC at 845.876.7666 
Chabad offers a wide range of programs for the entire Jewish community. No membership is necessary, and we welcome all — regardless of affiliation or background.

Chabad provides a non-judgmental, welcoming environment for Jewish families and individuals to explore our rich heritage.

Posted in Chabad Dutchess, Jewish, Red Hook, religion, Rhinebeck House's of Worship, Rhinebeck Jewish Center, Village of Rhinebeck | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment