Painting for sale

A painting on canvas, signed and professionally framed.

CAM00087

$250.00 OBO. All offers considered.

Contact for details

Phone: Ariana @ (845) 389-8674

Email: ariana@boudica.us

Posted in Kingston, Red Hook, Rhinebeck | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Visit Love Stitches By Naomi

Click image for online store

or click here to visit on face book.

Posted in Business, Dutchess county, Mid-Hudson Valley, Red Hook, Red Hook Business, Rhinebeck, Rhinebeck Business, Uncategorized, Village of Rhinebeck | Leave a comment

Party at the RJC! and schedule

Party at the RJC! 

The Rhinebeck Jewish Center kindly invites you to Simchas Torah Party!
This Thursday Oct. 16th 7:30pm at the RJC.
Food! Drink! and Dance!

Hakafot: On simchas torah we dance with the torah as a groom dances with his bride to show our happiness for concluding the reading of the torah throughout the year and the re-beginning of a new cycle.
————————————————————
 

Full schedule
 
Wednesday Oct. 15,
Hakafot Warm Up 6:45 pm

Thursday Oct. 16
Service 9:30 am
Yizkor Memorial Service 10:30 am
Hakafot and Dinner 7:30 pm

Friday Oct. 17,
Morning Services 10:00 am

Shabbat Oct, 18th,
Morning services at 9:30 am

Visit our website for the full flyer
Find us on Facebook
Join the Rhinebeck Jewish Center Facebook group and stay updated on upcoming events!
Posted in Chabad Dutchess, events, Jewish, religion, religious services, Rhinebeck, Rhinebeck House's of Worship, Rhinebeck Jewish Center | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Heroes of Faith

Heroes of Faith

Originally posted on Naomi Fata:

Have you ever wondered what it really means to have faith? To truly trust God beyond what we are humanly capable of?

George Muller

My great faith hero is George Muller. Though I have never read his complete biography I have known parts of his story since childhood. He determined never to ask people for money but only to ask God. His life work was founding orphanages. For all the needs of food, clothing and housing for the little ones he sought God and God never failed Him.

The promise of Philippians 4:19

And my God will meet all your needs according to the riches of his glory in Christ Jesus.

In introspection I have asked myself how many times I have truly sought God in times of need versus how frequently I talk to others about it or spend my thoughts fretting about it. To live with the…

View original 201 more words

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Wishing you all to be sealed for a good year! Unity – Forgiveness

davening

Dear Friends,

Yom Kippur begins tomorrow night. It is the day of Divine forgiveness. Of fasting and prayer.  A day when the fate of every living thing is sealed. We pray that each and every one of you and the entire People of Israel be sealed in the Book of Life for a year of good health, sustenance, nachas from your children and all that you need and want. 

It is the day where each and every Jew comes “face to face” one on one with G-d. The day, that no matter what kind of a Jew you are, or think you may be, all those external layers fall away. You are a Jew at the inner core of your being. Whether you have your issues with G-d or not, this is the day that  you as a Jew confront that no matter what , you are a Jew. And  as a Jew your bond with G-d is unbreakable. NO matter what you’ve done or haven’t done, Yom Kippur is the day that bond is reestablished. 

Let’s try to make the day count. Renew our relationship with G-d. On His terms, not ours. 

For while the Essence of a Jew can never disconnect from G-d, the way to have a true and meaningful relationship with G-d is through fulfilling His Mitzvot. That’s how the finite and the Infinite can merge. 

That’s what happens on Yom Kippur. The ultimate bonding of a Jew with G-d. For 26 hours. 

Yom Kippur is observed through refraining from:
1. Eating and drinking (all males above the age of 13 and females above the age of 12 are required to fast, including pregnantt and nursing moms. For serious medical or health considerations, consult a competent G-d fearing Rabbi   (and doctor)                                                            .
2. Bathing or washing or pleasure
3. sexual relations
4. wearing leather shoes
5. anointing oneself for pleasure
yizkor It is also customary to light a Yizkor candle before the start of the Holy Day for deceased parents as Yizkor will be said during Day Services. 

As Yom Kippur is the day of Divine Forgiveness, it’s important to mention that our rabbis say that sins between man and G-d, if one truly regrets them, the day offers forgivensee. But to receive forgiveness for sins between man and man, we must seek the person we have hurt’s forgiveness in order to receive Divine forgiveness. 

We thus ask anyone who we may have hurt in any way for forgiveness. 

Wishing you all an easy fast and a healthy, happy and prosperous New year with peace in our Holy Land and the world over.

Gmar Chasima Tova-May you all be sealed for a good year!

Gut Shabbos and Gut Yom Tov,

Rabbi Yacov and Hindy Borenstein
Posted in Chabad Lubavitch of Mid-Hudson Valley, Dutchess county, Jewish, Poughkeepsie, religion, religious services | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Shabbat Shalom! RJC 10/1/2014

Rhinebeck Jewish Center

Upcoming Events/Calendar
———————————–

 

 

 

Yom Kippur

Friday, Oct. 3, 2014

Fast Begins at: 6:17 pm

Kol Nidrei Services: 6:20 pm

 

Saturday, Oct. 4, 2014

Morning Services: 10:00 am

Yizkor Memorial Service: 12:00 am

Afternoon Service: 6:00 pm

Neilah Closing Service: 5:45 pm

Fast ends at: 7:15 pm

Followed by Bageks and Lox

Hebrew School

The RJC’s proud to announce the launch of Hebrew School, a project of J.E.P.!
Please view the flyer below for information!

Greetings!
We hope you will join us for our meaningful and inspirational Yom Kippur Services. With easy to follow programs suitable for people of all walks of life, the Rhinebeck Jewish Center is the perfect place to observe the holiest day of the year.
Please view our Yom Kippur schedule on the left and below in the flyer. Looking forward to greeting you!

Shabbat Shalom and Easy Fast,
Rabbi Hanoch and Tzivie Hecht

 

Short Thought:

Yom Kippur:
 

 

 

Yom Kippur is the holiest day of the year-the day on which we are closest to G-d and to the quintessence of our own souls. It is the Day of Atonement-“For on this day He will forgive you, to purify you, that you be cleansed from all your sins before G-d” (Leviticus 16:30).

For nearly twenty-six hours-from several minutes before sunset on 9 Tishrei to after nightfall on 10 Tishrei-we “afflict our souls”: we abstain from food and drink, do not wash or anoint our bodies, do not wear leather footwear, and abstain from marital relations.

Before Yom Kippur we perform the Kaparot atonement service; we request and receive honey cake, in acknowledgement that we are all recipients in G-d’s world, and in prayerful hope for a sweet and abundant year; eat a festive meal; immerse in a mikvah; and give extra charity. In the late afternoon we eat the pre-fast meal, following which we bless our children, light a memorial candle as well as the holiday candles, and go to the synagogue for the Kol Nidrei service.

In the course of Yom Kippur we hold five prayer services: Maariv, with its solemn Kol Nidrei service, on the eve of Yom Kippur; Shacharit-the morning prayer, which includes a reading from Leviticus followed by the Yizkor memorial service; Musaf, which includes a detailed account of the Yom Kippur Temple service; Minchah, which includes the reading of the Book of Jonah; and Neilah, the “closing of the gates” service at sunset. We say the Al Chet confession of sins eight times in the course of Yom Kippur, and recite Psalms every available moment.

The day is the most solemn of the year, yet an undertone of joy suffuses it: a joy that revels in the spirituality of the day and expresses the confidence that G-d will accept our repentance, forgive our sins, and seal our verdict for a year of life, health and happiness. The closing Neilah service climaxes in the resounding cries of “Hear O Israel . . . G-d is one.” Then joy erupts in song and dance (a Chabad custom is to sing the lively “Napoleon’s March“), followed by a single blast of the shofar, followed by the proclamation, “Next year in Jerusalem.” We then partake of a festive after-fast meal, making the evening after Yom Kippur a yom tov (festival) in its own right.

 

 

 

Humor

A young man from Mississippi came running into the store and said to his buddy, “Bubba, somebody just stole your pickup truck from the parking lot!”

Bubba replied, “Did y’all see who it was?”

The young man answered, “I couldn’t tell, but I got the license plate number.”

Announcements
Please say Tehilim for a complete Refuah Shelemah for our friends:

 Mr.Curtis Katz . Hebrew name: Tzadok Hacohen ben Esther
Mrs. Barbara Glazer : Baila Gittel bas Mindel
Menachem Mendel ben Menucha Rochel
Huna Yael ben Mindel
Mindel Bayla Bas Chana Esther
Simone Pearl Pincus Har-Even, Hebrew name: Sima bas Mindel

May we only share good news!

Please contact us to have a Mazal Tov or Announcement placed here to share with the community.
845.876.7666 or Rabbi@sixminuterabbi.com

Candle Lighting Times:  
Friday, October 3
Eve of Yom Kippur
Light Candles at: 6:16 pm
Shabbat, October 4
Yom Kippur
Shabbat/Holiday Ends: 7:13 pm
If you or someone you know are in need of candles and/or information about lighting Shabbat candles, please contact the RJC at 845.876.7666 
Chabad offers a wide range of programs for the entire Jewish community. No membership is necessary, and we welcome all — regardless of affiliation or background.

Chabad provides a non-judgmental, welcoming environment for Jewish families and individuals to explore our rich heritage.

 
Posted in Chabad Dutchess, Dutchess county, Jewish, Red Hook, religion, religious services, Rhinebeck, Rhinebeck House's of Worship | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

An Open Letter ~ What to expect at Chabad

Rosh Hashanah is this evening. Many of you have asked me questions about High Holiday services at Chabad thus prompting me to write this email.
Our services are quick. Sermons are funny. And if we do our job right, meaningful. You’ll be thinking about them after the services. This may lead to a lively conversation. Or even a spirited debate. Imagine that.
Our services are spoken in English and Hebrew. You won’t have any trouble following along.
You don’t need to belong to our synagogue to get a good seat.
Sure, we’d love to have your support but partnership is never required to attend any of our programs or services. Ever.
Children are welcome. The more the better. We have a few of our own.
Ninety-five percent of the people you’ll meet at Chabad aren’t Orthodox. There are Jews of every persuasion-Reform, Conservative, Modern Orthodox, Reconstructionist & Jewish Renewal.
In fact, if you’re a member of another synagogue and join us, you’re likely to run into other members while you’re here. Don’t worry. What happens at Chabad, stays at Chabad:).
We’re a friendly congregation. If you’re new to our services, be prepared. Someone will make you feel welcome.
There are people who join us to pray. There are people who join us to kibitz.
And to make new friends. If you’re here simply for some alone time, we’re good with that.
Now that you know a little bit about us, you may find yourself asking, “What do you actually believe?”
Good question. We ask it of ourselves often. We don’t have all the answers, but we do have some.
So here’s a start.
We believe the world is a good place and that light dispels darkness. We believe that Judaism should bring people together, not keep them apart.
Our differences are opportunities for learning and growth.
We believe that helping to bring out the best in others leads to bringing out the best in ourselves. We believe in acts of kindness and maintaining a healthy sense of humor.
Laughter is a good thing. So is smiling. You’ll see a lot of smiles here at Chabad. So smile freely. We’re big on the whole joy thing.
If you won’t try it, you won’t know what you are missing. If you’d like to experience something a bit different this year, visit us @ chabadmidhudsonvly@prodigy.net or give us a call at 845-463-5801 and we’ll save you some seats. Free. And as always, our pleasure.
We look forward to spending the High Holidays with you and your family at the Mercury Grand Hotel, 2170 South Rd., P’ok.
Come join us as we bring in the New Year with family and friends at a Family Rosh Hashanah Dinner.

 

Enjoy a Holiday Dinner with all the traditional foods. Round Challah, apples n honey, gefilte fish and salads, brisket, farfel and noodle kugel, tzimmes and roasted vegetables. Vegetarian option available upon request.

 

Suggested donation: $15 pp (following Services).
Wednesday Evening, September 24 at 7:15 PM

L’Shana Tova,
Rabbi Yacov & Hindy Borenstein
 

Posted in Chabad Lubavitch of Mid-Hudson Valley, Jewish, religion, religious holidays, religious services | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Here Comes the Judge!

news1-15-10

Chabad of Mid-Hudson Valley Newsletter

Friday, August 29, 2014
Elul 3, 5774
Parshat Shoftim
Pirkei Avot: Chapter 1

       logo                       B”H 


A word from the Rabbi


Shabbat Services: 10:00 AM followed by a delicious kiddush.

hebrew school

      ~ 2014-2015 REGISTRATION NOW OPEN ~

Hebrew school begins September 7

chabad hebrew school

Chabad Hebrew School offers a Jewish education that’s stimulating, hands-on and meaningful. Chabad, with its non-judgmental approach, embraces all children regardless of their affiliation or their level of observance. The focus is to instill Jewish pride and a strong Jewish identity in the children. The teachers are passionate about what they teach and are living role models.

A significant ingredient of our program is making Judaism exciting and fun for the children. Thus, children love coming to Chabad Hebrew School.

No child will be turned away due to financial difficulties.

 

rosh hashana banner

High Holiday Services with Chabad

at the Mercury Grand Hotel

 

Dear Friends, 

 

Don’t be judgmental. Unless, of course, you happen to be a judge. Then it’s your job.

 

This week’s Torah portion, Parshat Shoftim, begins with the biblical command for judges to be appointed in every city and town to adjudicate and maintain a just, ordered, civil society. Interestingly, it occurs in the first week of Elul, the month in which we are to prepare in earnest for the Days of Judgment ahead, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur.

 

There are, however, some significant differences between earthly judges of flesh and blood and the heavenly judge. In the earthly court, if after a fair trial a defendant is found guilty, then there’s really not much room for clemency on the part of the judge. The law is the law and must take its course. The accused may shed rivers of tears, but no human judge can be certain if his remorse is genuine. His feelings of regret are touching, but of limited legal consequence. After all, a human judge may only make a decision based on “what the eye can see.” The misdeed was seen to have been committed. The remorse, who knows? Perhaps he’s a good actor and is only acting contrite. The Supreme Judge, however, does know whether the accused genuinely regrets his actions or is merely putting on an act. Therefore, He alone is able to forgive. That is why in heavenly judgments, teshuvah (repentance) is effective.

 

The Maharal of Prague gave another reason. Only G-d is able to judge the whole person. Every one of us has good and bad to some extent. Even those who have sinned may have many other good deeds that outweigh the bad ones. Perhaps even one good deed was of such major significance that it alone could serve as a weighty counterbalance. The point is, only G-d knows. Only He can judge the individual in the context of his whole life and all his deeds, good and bad.

 

Our goal is to emulate the heavenly court. We should try to look at the totality of the person. You think he is bad, but is he all bad? Does he have no redeeming virtues? Surely, he must have some good in him as well. Look at the whole person.

 

A teacher once conducted an experiment. He held up a white plate and showed it to the class. In the center of the plate was a small black spot. He then asked the class to describe what they saw. One student said he saw a black spot. Another said it must be a target for shooting practice. A third suggested that the plate was dirty or damaged. Whereupon the teacher asked, “Doesn’t anyone see a white plate?”

 

There may have been a small black spot, but essentially it was a white plate. Why do we only see the dirt? Let us learn to find the good in others. Nobody is perfect, not even ourselves. Let’s not be so judgmental and critical. Let’s try to see the good in others.

Shabbat Shalom, 

Rabbi Yacov & Hindy Borenstein

http://www.chabadmidhudsonvalley.com  

Jewish Humor!

Joke.jpg

Once, a salesman approached a home and heard a big commotion inside. When the door was opened by a man, the salesman asked if he could speak to the master of the home.

“Well, sir,” came the reply, “you will have to wait around a bit; we are deciding just that right at this moment.”

The New Extension to the Chabad Center
chabad house
To view it in full scale, click on image.
If you wish to dedicate or contribute for the New Bais Chabad Center please call the Rabbi for an appointment.
The Rebbe
rebbe

To learn more about the Rebbe, click on the picture above.

 Candle Lighting Times

 for
 Poughkeepsie, NY   
Shabbat Candles
Friday, August 29 

 
Light Candles at
7:16 PM
Shabbat ends at:
8:15 PM
Upcoming Events
Shabbat Services 

10:00 AM
followed by a delecious kiddush

 

Sunday morning services:
Bagels, Lox & Torah
 Service 9:30 AM
Breakfast 10:00 AM
at the Chabad Center
 
Women’s Torah class:
Torah and Tea
Wednesday’s 10:00 AM
at the Borenstein’s home
Quick Links
Donate Now
Donate Now
Join Our Mailing List
Mazal Tov
chabad house
If you would like to include a Mazal Tov please call
(845) 463-5801
or e-mail: chabadmidhudsonvly@prodigy.net
Mikvah
Ask The Rabbi
You have a question?

Ask the Rabbi,
email
or call
(845) 463-5801

Posted in Chabad Lubavitch of Mid-Hudson Valley, Dutchess county, Jewish, Poughkeepsie, prayer, religion | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Shabbat Shalom! RJC 8/28/2014

Rhinebeck Jewish Center

Upcoming Events
———————————–

Kiddush Club 
Shabbat Day
Services 9:30 AM
Followed by a delicious Kiddush
102 Montgomery St., Rhinebeck NY 12572

 

Hebrew School

The RJC’s proud to announce the launch of Hebrew School!
Details to be announced, stay tuned!

Greetings!
We would like to wish you and yours a wonderful Labor Day Weekend. Please join us for Services Friday Night (7:15 PM) and Minyan on Shabbat Day (9:30 AM).
We’ve had such a successful Summer and are looking forward to an amazing Fall season! Stay tuned for our upcoming programs and events!

Shabbat Shalom,
Rabbi Hanoch and Tzivie Hecht

 

Short Thought:

Our hands did not spill this blood, and our eyes did not see… (21:7) But would it enter one’s mind that the elders of the court are murderers? Rather, [they declare:] We did not see him and let him depart without food or escort.

(Talmud, Sotah 45a)

The principle behind the law of Eglah Arufah is that a person is also responsible for what occurs outside of his domain — outside of the areas where he is fully in control. When a murdered traveler is found out in the field, the elders of the nearest city must go out there and bring the Eglah Arufah to atone for the crime, although it occurred “outside of their jurisdiction”; for it was nevertheless their responsibility to send the traveler off with adequate provision and protection.

The same applies on the personal level in all areas of life. A person never has the right to say, “This is outside of my element. I have no obligation to deal with this.” If it is something that, by Divine Providence, one has been made aware of, that means that there is something one can, and must, do to positively influence the end result.

(The Lubavitcher Rebbe)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Humor

A rabbi, a priest and a minister are discussing when life begins.

The priest says: “In our religion, life begins at conception.”

The minister says: “We disagree. We believe that life begins when the fetus is viable outside of the mother’s womb.”

The rabbi responds: “You both are wrong. In our religion, life begins when all of the children are married off.”

Announcements
Please say Tehilim for a complete Refuah Shelemah for our friends:

 Mr.Curtis Katz . Hebrew name: Tzadok Hacohen ben Esther
Mrs. Barbara Glazer : Baila Gittel bas Mindel
Menachem Mendel ben Menucha Rochel
Huna Yael ben Mindel
Mindel Bayla Bas Chana Esther
Simone Pearl Pincus Har-Even, Hebrew name: Sima bas Mindel

May we only share good news!

Please contact us to have a Mazal Tov or Announcement placed here to share with the community.
845.876.7666 or Rabbi@sixminuterabbi.com

Candle Lighting Times:  
Friday, August 29
Light Candles at: 7:16 pm
Shabbat, August 30
Shabbat Ends: 8:15 pm
If you or someone you know are in need of candles and/or information about lighting Shabbat candles, please contact the RJC at 845.876.7666 
Chabad offers a wide range of programs for the entire Jewish community. No membership is necessary, and we welcome all — regardless of affiliation or background.

Chabad provides a non-judgmental, welcoming environment for Jewish families and individuals to explore our rich heritage.

Posted in Chabad Dutchess, Dutchess county, Jewish, Mid-Hudson Valley, Red Hook, religion, religious services, Rhinebeck, Rhinebeck House's of Worship, Rhinebeck Jewish Center, Village of Rhinebeck | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment